Subhash Chandra Bose – After the airplane crash (?)

There was an article on Subhash Chandra Bose some time ago on this site, which contained information on the subject. Now some more information has been added to the original article:

The new technology – Information Technology – has made it possible for common men to share information that come their way. Here is the new information in the following video “Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose in Faizabad“. After viewing this video and additionally taking these news (made available recently by newspapers) into account, the only question before this country remains: How did Subhash Chandra Bose spend his remaining life after he escaped alive by creating a false airplane-crash smokescreen? The news recently published in newspapers was:

  1. In reply to the Right To Information application of an RTI activist Subhash Aggarwal demanding to provide him information of the contents of “Three Confidential Files on Subhash Chandra Bose” maintained by the Government of India, the Government refused to provide the requested information on the ground that “making the requested information public would affect the Indian relations with foreign powers adversely.”
  2. The report of “Justice Mukherji Inquiry Commission on Subhash Chandra Bose” has concluded, after going into the most minute details of the evidence available in India, Japan, Formosa and Russia, that Bose did not die in the touted airplane crash on August 19, 1945.

The only questions that now remain to be answered by the concerned authorities – Indian and foreign – are as under:

  1.  By all accounts, Bose was kept in custody by Joseph Stalin in the Soviet Union after he entered into that country after creating a smoke screen of airplane crash to avoid detection by the British Government. Bose opposed Adolph Hitler’s plan to invade Soviet Union by saying to the Führer that “It is an aggression on Soviet Union.” This information is on historical records (Refer to the chapter on Bose in the book “A good German by Giles MacDonough; also see reviews of this book by many knowledgeable and eminent historians, which all are available on the net). It is also on historical record that Bose after escaping from the British confinement in India via Kabul (Afghanistan) had first landed in the Soviet Union. During his short stay / stopover of a few hours in the Soviet Union, Bose had been able to put before the Soviet leader Stalin his idea/proposal to fight the British power in India with the support of the Soviet Union. Stalin did not approve the idea (may be, considering Bose not sufficiently equipped to take on the task; or, for strategic reasons – in an ongoing WW II – did not consider it fit to antagonize the British). Stalin not only allowed Bose to fly out of the Soviet Union, he permitted the refueling of his plane to fly out to Berlin (Germany). This was only for these cordial overtures between Stalin and Bose during the initial phase of the World War that when he had to escape from the British forces and enter the Soviet Union Bose was not killed by Stalin. He was allowed to live. The question ‘how Bose should be treated’ must have a great dilemma to Stalin. On the one hand, Stalin knew that Bose was a very popular political leader in India (it is on record that Stalin directed his ambassador to Afghanistan – in 1949, much after the alleged airplane crash – to gather the intelligence about the state of Bose’s popularity among Indian people and the ambassador sent his report to Stalin informing that Bose is greatly popular leader among Indians; that he would certainly replace (Jawahar Lal) Nehru in the Indian Government; that in view of the his popularity, Nehru had to induct in his Government Bose’s kinsman as a Government Minister); that Bose was a sworn enemy of the British – the British whom Stalin also considered in his heart of hearts an enemy but was apparently obliged to treat them (British) as friends of the Soviet Union as being a part of the Allied Forces; that by allowing Bose to go to India, the Soviet Union would be antagonizing not only the British – who were after the blood of Bose – but also the Indian leaders who were ruling. On the other hand, to Stalin Bose was a person who was on the side of Adolph Hitler and was an out right enemy. Bose was an enemy to Stalin because of the circumstances and Stalin knew it very well, and for that reason alone he must have had a soft corner for him and so did not kill him.

  2. By all accounts it seems reasonable that Bose was kept in confinement by Stalin (may be somewhere in Siberia), weighing all along how to deal with him. The questions before Stalin must have been: How the release of Bose would affect the Soviet Union’s relations with post-independence India and the post-war Britain. As the conduct of Stalin as a dictator exhibited in the Soviet occupation of Berlin (till he lived) and in his dealings with the Western powers after WW II would show, he (Stalin) was little wary of the British, if at all. However, it is also on record that free India was under an obligation to the British to hand-over Bose to them if ever he was found alive. To the British, Bose was a war criminal and, if captured, he was to be tried for the offence (as other accused belonging to the Azad Hind Fauz were tried by them). It is also known to everyone that India got freedom by negotiation under a Transfer of Power instrument (India Independence Act passed by the British Parliament). Was Stalin under pressure from India not to release him and create a problem for India (any attempt to hand over Bose to the British would have put India on fire)?

  3. Now the official reason for refusing to give the requested information (of the ‘three confidential files’ on Bose to Subhash Aggarwal RTI activist) is that revealing their contents to public would adversely impact India’s relations with foreign powers. One can very well guess that these foreign powers could not be other than the Britain and the present day Russia. If it is found that Bose was kept in prison in the Soviet Union, it cannot be blamed on that country for many reasons. Firstly, Russian dictator did not kill Bose in the first case; it was very natural of that country to kill its enemy who sided with Hitler. India would reconcile with the then existing circumstances and would rather appreciate the gesture of not out rightly killing its leader (and, later on sending Bose to India as the video “Bose in Faizabad” shows). Of course, the relations with Britain may be strained on revealing the facts buried in the three secret files.

  4. After viewing the video, perusing the Justice Mukherji Commission Report and analyzing the reason of refusal by the government, the logical events seem like this: (1) There was some understanding among the states of Soviet Union, India and, may be, Britain that Bose would be allowed to live his remaining life In India but incognito (without revealing his identity). Bose must have been under solemn oath not to ever reveal his real identity. In these unfortunate circumstances, he would have lived in Faizabad in U. P. This arrangement would have certainly saved the face of Indian government; respect of the Soviet Union; and, perhaps, boiling down of the rage of Britain.

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1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. Swapankumar Mazumder
    Mar 21, 2015 @ 10:08:55

    Not a single betrayel was committed by Netaji at all in the cause of freedom of our country-India from British rule [Sat,21-03-2015,at 10:05:45 AM/Hr/IST] I reserve this comment as made by myself for which I am ready to debate on it with some of my collegues advocates,High Court at Calcutta….

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